Ramadan

13 Must-Try Iftar Foods From Around The World

ramadan-mubarak

The Muslim population encompasses cultures from all around the world, and the way each community breaks their fast is  an amazing thing to see. While the sambosaks (called with slight variations around the globe) is a common feature on most iftar tables across the world, it is the different dishes that we’d like to focus on in this article.


So if by mid Ramadan, you and your guests are bored of the same iftar dishes again and again, you can get some inspiration here to make your iftar table even more appealing to the fasting souls.

Afghanistan – Bolani

Baked or fried flatbread that is stuffed with vegetables and is normally served with yoghurt. Use the baked option if you want to go healthy this Ramadan.

Credit: wikimedia.org

Credit: wikimedia.org

Bangladesh – Beguni

This Ramadan special is made from thin slices of eggplant coated in chickpea batter that is fried in oil.

Credit: yummyfoodmadeeasy

Credit: yummyfoodmadeeasy

India – Haleem

Packed with proteins, the haleem is similar to the Arabian dish of harees,  being a stew made from wheat, lentils and meat. It is easily available in most Indian restaurants across the kingdom throughout the holy month.haleem

Indonesia – Es Campur

A cold dessert made from jackfruit, coconut, sea weed, milk, syrup and shaved ice. From street hawkers to upscale restaurants, it is found everywhere in Indonesia during Ramadan.

Credit: cupuwaturesto.com

Credit: cupuwaturesto.com

Malaysia – Bandung

A thirst-quenching drink made from evaporated or condensed milk that is flavored with rose-cordial syrup.

Credit: thekindcook.com

Credit: thekindcook.com

Maldives – Kulhi Boakiba

This dish is the Maldivian version of the fishcake. Though it looks like a dessert, it is anything but that. Made from flaked tuna and coarsely ground rice, the taste of this one surely hard to forget.

Credit: Hanooh blog

Credit: Hanooh blog

Pakistan – Falooda

Served as an ice cream sundae float, the ingredients of this sweet dish are psyllium seeds, boiled vermicelli, rose water, milk and is sometimes topped with ice cream.Perfect for the Ramadan in summer.

Credit: homemaker diary blog

Credit: homemaker diary blog

Kazakhistan – Beshbarmaq

Though it’s common amongst all Turkic people of Central Asia and not limited only to Kazakhistan; it is one of often associated with the latter. Beshbarmaq literally means five fingers; as the dish is meant to be eaten with hands.

Credit: wikimedia.org

Credit: wikimedia.org

Lebanon / Palestine – Malfoof

Quite popular in Saudi Arabia as well, these cabbage rolls straight from the Levant are absolutely delectable. Stuffed with meat and rice, this appetizer should definitely be on your iftar table.

Credit: mamaslebanesekitchen.com

Credit: mamaslebanesekitchen.com

Morocco – Harira

This is a traditional Moroccon soup that is extremly popular in the month of Ramadan. It consists of flour, tomatoes, chickpeas, onions, lentils, rice, meat  and olive oil.

Credit: delicious.com

Credit: delicious.com

Saudi Arabia – Luqaimat

Though it is popular across Arabia; being a staple Ramadan food item in Saudi Arabia, we couldn’t help but associating the dish with the kingdom. Despite these crunchy sweet dumplings being on the oilier side, in Ramadan we all forget that part and can’t help but gorge on it.

Credit: munatycooking1

Credit: munatycooking1

Sri Lanka – Kanji

There are several varieties of this dish, the most common one in Ramadan however is the rice-based one mixed with chicken or beef.beef-kanji

Turkey – Ramadan Pidesi

Very rarely would one come across a Ramadan dish that has Ramadan in its name, this is one such of those rarities. The Ramadan Pidesi is a type of traditional soft leavened Turkish bread that is topped with sesame.Pidesi

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