Food, Food News, Online Magazine

April's Dining Scoop

  • 71/2
  • 52/2

INSTAGRAM TRIAL BY JURY

We at DR are very partial to Italy and most things that come out of the aptly boot-shaped country. So when we heard of a newcomer to the Instagram business scene that specialized in Sicilian cannoli, we were sold.

Well, partially sold, anyhow. We had our doubts. But the next time the owners had a shipment ready, we went ahead and ordered the mini cannoli in the cinnamon, chocolate chip and plain varieties. Delivery was a smooth affair, and the cannolis were packaged nicely, if a little basic. The prices are just a wee bit steep if you want to order the large cannolis, but overall it’s fine. The cannolis themselves were delicious! Luckily our doubts were unfounded.


Update: We hear they’re opening an actual shop on Dabbab Street soon. Let’s hope there’s a sit in café.
Price: SR15 for the standard size/SR5 for the minis
Delivery: Free
Rating Overall: 4
Instagram: @dolceragusa

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Breaking Dawn on Olaya: Almasaa Café

Alfresco dining has been all the rage this past season. One of the more popular spots in the city, Almasaa Café on Olaya Street, saw enough traffic that they opened up the singles section for families from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends! We couldn’t resist the temptation of the possibility of two breakfasts (one at 6 a.m. and another at the office), so off we went in the sunrise to try out the cuisine of the place. The first snag we hit was the service; while the restaurant had four/five managers hovering, service was slow and it took 15 – 20 minutes to get anything done. And the food is ordinary, nothing one would crave. The view and general atmosphere, however, was worth the visit. And they open at 6 a.m., which counts for something.

Give good weather one last grappling hug before it leaves!

By Faris Al Yahya

Tucked Away
Hala Walla, Food Fans!

Lately I’ve been noticing that a lot of traditional Saudi coffee places around Riyadh have started serving typical Saudi-grandma-type traditional breakfasts. Normal fare includes traditional Arabic coffee, marasee’, masabeeb, qeshd, hinaini and so on. Mawtun Zaman is smaller than the other spacious places I found, a literal hole.

I was disappointed to find that there wasn’t any traditional floor seating, just uncomfortable chairs and a very poor atmosphere, with very dim lighting even with the lights fully on. You can tell they made… some effort. But now let’s get down to what’s important: their so called traditional food. I had marasee’, which were bad. It was cooked on a crepe pan it tasted like old wheat mixed with toothpaste and drenched with honey to hide the taste. And the hinaini was frozen and cooked in a microwave then dumped with ghee on top. Even the Arabic coffee tasted weird.

Overall, it was a dreadful experience. I’ll stick to going to Najd Village or better yet just ask my grandma make me the best marasee’, like how they’re supposed to be made.

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Shakshooka

There is little to dislike in traditional Najdi breakfasts. With kebdah (pan-fried liver), masabeeb (mini wheat pancakes, either with honey or an onion mix), hinaini and a healthy amount of carbs, it’s one of the most beautiful things about the region. Oh, and shakshooka. Oh, shakshooka, how perfect you are.

Beloved by everyone with the taste to love and recognize magical things, shakshooka is a type of scrambled egg that’s mixed with pan-fried chopped onions and tomatoes. It’s mostly served off the pan, but occasionally some people cook it in a dish in the oven for more flavor. Cold peppers can be added as well, if that’s your kind of thing. The dish can be found everywhere from hole in the wall bouffiyehs to established restaurants like Wadek or Drdshat.

Bottom line is, we’re gigantic fans. Life is never as good as when you have a foul and shakshooka breakfast, take our word for that!

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